Archive for the ‘CEO blogs’ Category

Executive Presence 2018

Executive presence is one of those terms that can mean a lot of different things, but I’ve always like the way John Beeson, principal of Beeson Consulting, defines it: “your ability to project mature self-confidence, a sense that you can take control of difficult, unpredictable situations; make tough decisions in a timely way and hold your own with other talented and strong-willed members of the executive team.”

In a column I wrote a while back for the Washington Business Journal, I explored with a couple of master executive coaches how executive presence is linked to public speaking. Late last year, Executive Coach Paul Geiger, author of Better Business Speech, offered some new perspective on the topic in an insightful CEOWORLD article.

His  “5 public Speaking Tips to Exude Executive Presence” are darn good. Two, in particular, stand out.

“Master the pause,” Geiger says. Terrific advice far too many executives ignore. “[T]he very best speakers know how to “play the silence in between.” … The interesting thing is that listeners really do pay attention to a deliberate gap in your spoken words. They perk up, anticipating what you’ll say next.”

In addition, Geiger counsels executives to “learn from the experts.”  When you know the leader you’re listening to has executive presence, watch closely what he or she does. Chances are you’ll observe several of the following characteristics:

  • Deliberate breathing
  • Full and varied gestures
  • Varied intonation (pitches are high and low, rhythms are fast and slow)
  • Purposeful and sweeping cadence
  • Appropriate eye contact
  • A clear, concise summation of the message (repeated often for emphasis)

Geiger’s article confirms that, while executive presence has many aspects, the key to projecting “mature self confidence” is the spoken word.

The Buck Stops Here….Or Does It?

A few years ago, I interviewed two of Lee Iacocca’s speechwriters for an article on how the former Chrysler CEO used speeches as a powerful management tool. One of the factors they stressed was that Iacocca always made it a point to get out front on issues. In particular, he took responsibility for problems and moved quickly to fix them.

A recent article in Chief Executive points out that too many of today’s executives take a much different approach. The author, Jeffrey Sonnenfeld of the Yale School of Management , starts out by noting the tendency of current political leaders (citing both President Trump and Hilary Clinton) to blame others for their setbacks.

Turning to the corporate world, he indicts high-profile CEOS, such as BP’s Tony Hayward and Wells Fargo’s John Stumpf, for also trying to wriggle out of responsibility for mistakes. This tendency is so widespread, psychologists have even given it a fancy label: “self-serving bias in attribution.”

I guess that sounds better than “being gutless.”

The good news is that there are still a lot of gutsy executives on the job. Sonnefeld reports that many corporate leaders “have shown us how to beat this bias through confession, courage, contrition and correction.” He cites James Burke of Johnson & Johnson confronting the Tylenol-tampering crisis, GM’s Mary Barra’s handling of the ignition-switch safety crisis, and Anne Mulcahy’s pulling Xerox back from the brink, among others.

I’ve been lucky to work for clients who are more like Iacocca than Trump. Here’s hoping the recent rise in self-serving bias in attribution is a blip, not a trend.

Adventures in Leadership

adventure-bookI can say for certain that I’ve never before written a post about somebody who has spent twenty years crisscrossing the continents to climb the world’s highest mountains. Seattle’s Matt Walker has done just that, but what makes him of interest to “The CEO at the Mic,” is the insight he gained at 24,000 feet during one moonlight in the Himalayas: that the essence of adventure could be a powerful tool to connect people with their leadership potential.

Now Matt helps people make that connection, strengthening their leadership qualities through keynotes, workshops, and team building adventure exercises. On his blog he also profiles experts who could be helpful to leaders looking to step up their game. Recently he was kind enough to include me. The interview was a great experience, and I think you’ll find it useful.

Here’s a preview:

Okay… is it really possible to improve a speech simply by using different words?

Absolutely. Speechwriting is writing for the ear. That is much different than writing for the eye, which is what you do when you produce an article or an annual report.

The complete interview is here.

My thanks to Matt.

Worst Business Cliche’s of 2016

clichesOne of the joys of January is the appearance of the “Annual List of the Worst Business Clichés,” compiled by PR pro Rob Deigh. Deigh produces his list every year to encourage every writer to get rid of “those fetid phrases that dull our otherwise-brilliant conversations and writing.”

I have to admit that the list also usually makes me feel a little embarrassed. You see, every once in a great, great while a couple of those clichés crept into speeches I wrote. I’ll blame the client for that.

You can find the full 2016 list on Deigh’s website, but here are the some of the ones I see popping up all too regularly these days. (Deigh’s punchier, clearer alternatives are in parens.)

  • It is what it is (the facts are)
  • Circle back (discuss again)
  • Touch base (contact)
  • Close the loop (tell everyone involved)
  • At the end of the day (ultimately)
  •  Mission critical (essential)

Seeing these clunky words and phrases compiled in a single list makes me want to add another resolution to my New Year’s goals:

Work harder to stamp out cliche’s in my work.

After all, it’s a no-brainer, right?


Check out Robb Deigh’s book, How Come No One Knows About Us?

Inspiration is More than Information

onion_logoIn a recent blog post, Pete Weissman, award-winning speechwriter and speaker who is founder of Thought Leader Communications, uses an Onion headline to make a great point about CEO communication.

The headline: “Jim Caldwell Provides Lions Players with Printouts of Inspiring Halftime Speech.” Weissman notes that while using a printed speech to inspire a football team would be a ridiculously terrible idea, CEOs often do something almost as bad: they try to inspire by overloading their audience with information.

“[H]ow many times have you sat through a presentation where the speaker filled every inch of the PowerPoint slide with text and expected to somehow inspire you?” he asks. The answer, of course, is `way too often.’

To inspire, a CEO has got to go way beyond assembling facts and reciting statistics. To give a speech that fires up employees and staff, Weissman recommends CEOs start by asking themselves three questions:

Does my speech have a good balance between appealing to the head and appealing to the heart?

Will delivering this speech “rally the troops” much more than just handing them a printout of the text?

Does the conclusion of my speech lift up the audience’s spirits?


If the answers to these questions is “no,” the chances are better that your speech will wind up in The Onion than in Vital Speeches of the Day.