Archive for the ‘CEO blogs’ Category

End with a Bang not a Whimper

FFC big1445168_origMy thanks to the editors of the Fairfax Chamber of Commerce’s blog for publishing my piece on strong endings.
As I note in the post,
What too many business leaders don’t realize is that, when it comes to motivating an audience, the ending is the most important part of an engaging presentation. Why? Because all of us tend to remember the last thing we hear a speaker say. A weak ending, therefore, usually means your presentation won’t have much impact, even if the beginning and middle are well done.

Unfortunately, I hear far too many executives finish up their remarks to an audience by saying something like this:

“Well, that’s about all I have to say, and I see my time is about up.”

“So now I’ll answer any questions.”

No listener is going to be moved by that kind of an ending.

You’ll find the complete post, including advice on endings that do grab audiences, here.

A Great List of “Do Not’s”

microphoneAnother great piece in Silicon Valley speechwriter Ian Griffin‘s terrific “Professionally Speaking” blog. This one is a guest post from U.K. media coach Alan Stevens, that is chock full of excellent tips on how to give a great speech. My favorite part of the piece, though is his concise list of things speakers should NEVER do. Such as…

  • Start badly
  • Fail to understand equipment
  • Put too much on each slide
  • Patronize the audience
  • Use bad graphics
  • Turn their back on the audience
  • Speak inaudibly
  • Use jargon
  • Run out of time
  • End poorly

“The CEO Reputation Premium,” new from Weber Shandwick

ceo-reputation-coffee cup

  • CEO reputation is more important than ever to the success of a company, and
  • Public speaking is a critically important tool for CEOs who want to build or strengthen their reputations.

These are just two of the fascinating findings from The CEO Reputation Premium: Gaining Advantage in the Engagement Era. It’s the latest study on CEO reputation from Weber Shandwick, in partnership with KRC Research.

The report, from WS’s Chief Reputation Strategist Dr. Leslie Gaines-Ross and others, finds that 81% of global executives believe external CEO engagement is now a mandate for building company reputation. Executives also strongly believe that their own CEO’s reputation contributes to nearly half of their company’s market value.

The whole report is well worth a read. Here are some of the highlights:

Highly regarded CEOs are good at external relations.

82% of executives believe that it’s most important for CEOs to speak at external events, and particularly at industry-related events.

CEOs should exercise caution when taking a public stance on policy

To bolster the CEO’s reputation, the CEO’s message or vision can be embedded in a compelling story that delineates the greater purpose behind the company.

For CEO Job Security, You Need a Vision…from smartCEO

smartceo_logoWith CEO firings peaking in 2014, top executives have to be thinking about how best to protect their jobs. In my latest Thought Leadership post for smartCEO, I point out how critically important to CEO job security is the ability to communicate a clear vision. You’ll  find the article here.

Executives: Include Public Speaking in Your Skill Set

FFC big1445168_origMy thanks to the folks at the Fairfax Chamber of Commerce for posting my piece in their brand new business blog. As a good writer should, I don’t waste time getting to the point:

Dynamic executives think long and hard about how to improve their skills, so they can both help their organizations succeed and also move forward in their careers. As you weigh the skill sets you need, be sure to include public speaking.
You’ll find the complete post here.