Archive for the ‘CEO blogs’ Category

John Mattone’s Expert Interview: Jeff Porro on Speechwriting

mattone logoMy thanks to John Mattone for profiling me as part of the “Expert Interview” feature of his blog. Mattone is a powerfully engaging, internationally-acclaimed keynote speaker and top-ranked executive coach. He is also widely regarded as the world’s leading authority on corporate culture, culture transformation and leadership. (You can learn more about Mattone’s experience and publications here.)

His interviews highlight experts who help executives take their leadership skills to the next level. It was a great interview to do, and I hope you find it useful.

Here’s a preview:

When should leaders and executives consider hiring a professional writer?

Whenever executives find they are not engaging their key audiences — inspiring them, moving them to action, persuading them — it’s time to hire a pro.

You’ll find the whole interview here.

 

Leading Voices: Rohit Bhargava, Trend Curator and Professional Speaker

Rohit Bhargava

Rohit Bhargava

In this space, we profile top executives who use the spoken word effectively as part of their corporate communication strategy

Rohit Bhargava is a man of so many talents and accomplishments that listing them all would fill this entire blog entry. The short version is that he is a “non-obvious” trend curator, founder of the Influential Marketing Group, and an expert in helping brands and leaders be more influential. He is the Wall Street Journal bestselling author of five books, has advised hundreds of global brands and teaches marketing at Georgetown University.
AND….he is the first executive featured in Leading Voices who not only uses the spoken word as a corporate communication strategy, but also generates revenue through his speeches.
Bhargava says that he “sort of fell into” the professional speaking part of his business. . “Over time, it was like going from waiting tables to starting a restaurant,” he says. He began his career as a writer, a pioneer branding and marketing blogger in the early years of the century. As the audience for his blogging grew, he started getting invited to be on panels – giving short presentations for free. After a few panel presentations, he realized “I had to find a way to stand out. Otherwise I was just wasting time by being forgettable.”
Once he got a reputation as a good speaker, he went from being a panel member, to being a panel moderator, to being asked to give solo presentations.
At first, these weren’t paid, but they were always an effective marketing tool. Moreover, the presentations gave Bhargava the chance to learn some important lessons about the spoken word. “I realized I had to tell more stories,” he says. “I learned to introduce complex themes at the start of my talk, and then come back to them. And I started to control my own visuals.”
As he developed his craft and his reputation continued to grow, instead of giving solo presentations for free he was delivering keynote addresses for pay, which is now an important income stream for him.
Among the keys to his current success as a speaker, Bhargava says, is that he insists on having an in-depth preparatory meeting or phone call with the organizers of each event. “I want to learn as much as possible about the audience.” In particular, he wants to hear from organizers, ‘What would you want the people listening to think or do differently as a result of hearing me speak.”
He also asks if there are sensitive topics or events he should stay away from. And he makes sure to ask what the audience might have heard before, and especially “what sounds clichéd to them.”
He enjoys the speaking part of his business, and is often asked by other executives or writers for advice on becoming speakers. First and foremost, Bhargava says, “Speaking leads to more speaking. If you have a chance to get in front of an audience – paid or unpaid – grab it.” Gradually, you’ll build a reputation, which can lead to for-pay opportunities.
He also strongly advises, “Get some good video of yourself. Not everyone can see you in person, but anybody who is thinking about booking you will want to see video.”
He emphasizes that he does mean good video. “Because it is so easy to get video these days, people who book speakers expect you to provide high quality video. So definitely avoid low quality phone photography.” Instead, invest in a professional videographer.
The spoken word is an important communication tool for every executive. Bhargava’s experience shows that for some it can be a key part of their business offerings, too.

End with a Bang not a Whimper

FFC big1445168_origMy thanks to the editors of the Fairfax Chamber of Commerce’s blog for publishing my piece on strong endings.
As I note in the post,
What too many business leaders don’t realize is that, when it comes to motivating an audience, the ending is the most important part of an engaging presentation. Why? Because all of us tend to remember the last thing we hear a speaker say. A weak ending, therefore, usually means your presentation won’t have much impact, even if the beginning and middle are well done.

Unfortunately, I hear far too many executives finish up their remarks to an audience by saying something like this:

“Well, that’s about all I have to say, and I see my time is about up.”

“So now I’ll answer any questions.”

No listener is going to be moved by that kind of an ending.

You’ll find the complete post, including advice on endings that do grab audiences, here.

A Great List of “Do Not’s”

microphoneAnother great piece in Silicon Valley speechwriter Ian Griffin‘s terrific “Professionally Speaking” blog. This one is a guest post from U.K. media coach Alan Stevens, that is chock full of excellent tips on how to give a great speech. My favorite part of the piece, though is his concise list of things speakers should NEVER do. Such as…

  • Start badly
  • Fail to understand equipment
  • Put too much on each slide
  • Patronize the audience
  • Use bad graphics
  • Turn their back on the audience
  • Speak inaudibly
  • Use jargon
  • Run out of time
  • End poorly

“The CEO Reputation Premium,” new from Weber Shandwick

ceo-reputation-coffee cup

  • CEO reputation is more important than ever to the success of a company, and
  • Public speaking is a critically important tool for CEOs who want to build or strengthen their reputations.

These are just two of the fascinating findings from The CEO Reputation Premium: Gaining Advantage in the Engagement Era. It’s the latest study on CEO reputation from Weber Shandwick, in partnership with KRC Research.

The report, from WS’s Chief Reputation Strategist Dr. Leslie Gaines-Ross and others, finds that 81% of global executives believe external CEO engagement is now a mandate for building company reputation. Executives also strongly believe that their own CEO’s reputation contributes to nearly half of their company’s market value.

The whole report is well worth a read. Here are some of the highlights:

Highly regarded CEOs are good at external relations.

82% of executives believe that it’s most important for CEOs to speak at external events, and particularly at industry-related events.

CEOs should exercise caution when taking a public stance on policy

To bolster the CEO’s reputation, the CEO’s message or vision can be embedded in a compelling story that delineates the greater purpose behind the company.