Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Worst Business Cliche’s of 2016

clichesOne of the joys of January is the appearance of the “Annual List of the Worst Business Clichés,” compiled by PR pro Rob Deigh. Deigh produces his list every year to encourage every writer to get rid of “those fetid phrases that dull our otherwise-brilliant conversations and writing.”

I have to admit that the list also usually makes me feel a little embarrassed. You see, every once in a great, great while a couple of those clichés crept into speeches I wrote. I’ll blame the client for that.

You can find the full 2016 list on Deigh’s website, but here are the some of the ones I see popping up all too regularly these days. (Deigh’s punchier, clearer alternatives are in parens.)

  • It is what it is (the facts are)
  • Circle back (discuss again)
  • Touch base (contact)
  • Close the loop (tell everyone involved)
  • At the end of the day (ultimately)
  •  Mission critical (essential)

Seeing these clunky words and phrases compiled in a single list makes me want to add another resolution to my New Year’s goals:

Work harder to stamp out cliche’s in my work.

After all, it’s a no-brainer, right?

 

Check out Robb Deigh’s book, How Come No One Knows About Us?

Inspiration is More than Information

onion_logoIn a recent blog post, Pete Weissman, award-winning speechwriter and speaker who is founder of Thought Leader Communications, uses an Onion headline to make a great point about CEO communication.

The headline: “Jim Caldwell Provides Lions Players with Printouts of Inspiring Halftime Speech.” Weissman notes that while using a printed speech to inspire a football team would be a ridiculously terrible idea, CEOs often do something almost as bad: they try to inspire by overloading their audience with information.

“[H]ow many times have you sat through a presentation where the speaker filled every inch of the PowerPoint slide with text and expected to somehow inspire you?” he asks. The answer, of course, is `way too often.’

To inspire, a CEO has got to go way beyond assembling facts and reciting statistics. To give a speech that fires up employees and staff, Weissman recommends CEOs start by asking themselves three questions:

Does my speech have a good balance between appealing to the head and appealing to the heart?

Will delivering this speech “rally the troops” much more than just handing them a printout of the text?

Does the conclusion of my speech lift up the audience’s spirits?

 

If the answers to these questions is “no,” the chances are better that your speech will wind up in The Onion than in Vital Speeches of the Day.

John Mattone’s Expert Interview: Jeff Porro on Speechwriting

mattone logoMy thanks to John Mattone for profiling me as part of the “Expert Interview” feature of his blog. Mattone is a powerfully engaging, internationally-acclaimed keynote speaker and top-ranked executive coach. He is also widely regarded as the world’s leading authority on corporate culture, culture transformation and leadership. (You can learn more about Mattone’s experience and publications here.)

His interviews highlight experts who help executives take their leadership skills to the next level. It was a great interview to do, and I hope you find it useful.

Here’s a preview:

When should leaders and executives consider hiring a professional writer?

Whenever executives find they are not engaging their key audiences — inspiring them, moving them to action, persuading them — it’s time to hire a pro.

You’ll find the whole interview here.

 

Leading Voices: Mike Daniels, Tech Pioneer, Former Chairman and CEO of Network Solutions

Mike Daniels

Mike Daniels

In this space, we profile top executives who use the spoken word effectively as part of their corporate communication strategy.

A few years ago, I had the opportunity to interview Mike Daniels, the former chairman and chief executive of Network Solutions, the Northern Virginia-based domain registration company. Daniels, a true pioneer of high tech in the Washington, D.C. area, currently sits on the board of directors of Blackberry, CACI International and Mercury Systems, all publicly traded technology companies.
When I talked to Daniels, he was vehement about vital link between the spoken word and the success of a CEO.
“It’s remarkable,” he said. “If you have two growth companies headed by equally smart guys, where one can deliver an enthusiastic speech, lay out the mission of the company and encourage people to work smarter and harder and the other can’t…it makes a world of difference to the success of the company.”
In a recent article in the Washington Post, Daniels shared more great insights about the role of public speaking in corporate success.
“Many of the technology people who are very smart and great technologists are not able to communicate their ideas,” Daniels told the Post. “They tend to be introverts focused on the technology. You need to lift your head up, see the strategic picture.” But the ones who became successful leaders, he said, “have had the skill to communicate their message and the mission to their employees.”
Daniels knows what he’s talking about, since he’s known just about all the technology greats: Bill Gates, Larry Ellison, Jeffrey P. Bezos, the late J. Robert Beyster, (founder of Science Applications International) and of course, the late Steve Jobs — “the best I ever saw in Silicon Valley in 40 years.”
Daniels shared with the Post that his own public speaking skills date back to his schoolboy days, when he won first prize and a cool $50 cash in the local Rotary Club’s debate contest. After that, he entered every oratory contest he could and became skilled enough to win a debating scholarship to Northwestern University.
When I interviewed him, I asked him whether most companies realize how important a CEO’s communication skills are.
“Based on my forty year business career,” he said. “I’d have to say it’s an underappreciated asset. While many organizations recognize how important speeches are, many others don’t.”

The Spoken Word: A Vital Tool for EA’s

WE-2Earlier this month I had the chance to speak WashingtonExec’s Executive Assistant Committee Dinner. My topic — “Improving Your Public Speaking Skills.” I shared some tips on how the EA’s could improve their own presentations (tip #1: writing for the eye is fundamentally different than writing for the ear.) I also shared my thoughts on ways they could help their principals improve their speeches (Start by making sure his or her speech is not generic, but instead fine tune it to resonate with a specific audience.)

My thanks to EA Committee Chair Jana DiCarlo, Founder & Principal of Backbone, LLC, for the invitation. A terrific group of listeners, armed with great questions and comments.