Posts Tagged ‘corporate speeches’

Executive Presence 2018

Executive presence is one of those terms that can mean a lot of different things, but I’ve always like the way John Beeson, principal of Beeson Consulting, defines it: “your ability to project mature self-confidence, a sense that you can take control of difficult, unpredictable situations; make tough decisions in a timely way and hold your own with other talented and strong-willed members of the executive team.”

In a column I wrote a while back for the Washington Business Journal, I explored with a couple of master executive coaches how executive presence is linked to public speaking. Late last year, Executive Coach Paul Geiger, author of Better Business Speech, offered some new perspective on the topic in an insightful CEOWORLD article.

His  “5 public Speaking Tips to Exude Executive Presence” are darn good. Two, in particular, stand out.

“Master the pause,” Geiger says. Terrific advice far too many executives ignore. “[T]he very best speakers know how to “play the silence in between.” … The interesting thing is that listeners really do pay attention to a deliberate gap in your spoken words. They perk up, anticipating what you’ll say next.”

In addition, Geiger counsels executives to “learn from the experts.”  When you know the leader you’re listening to has executive presence, watch closely what he or she does. Chances are you’ll observe several of the following characteristics:

  • Deliberate breathing
  • Full and varied gestures
  • Varied intonation (pitches are high and low, rhythms are fast and slow)
  • Purposeful and sweeping cadence
  • Appropriate eye contact
  • A clear, concise summation of the message (repeated often for emphasis)

Geiger’s article confirms that, while executive presence has many aspects, the key to projecting “mature self confidence” is the spoken word.

I Tried Stand-Up, and Improved my Speeches

Many thanks to Vital Speeches of the Day editor David Murray, for publishing my piece on the lessons speechwriters can learn from the craft of stand-up comedy. In the article, I describe how–after years of fear of failure–I finally took the plunge and tried my hand at stand-up. Wisely, I took a course first, which was superb, taught by our wonderful teacher Chris Coccia, a Philadelphia comic. The big surprise was how much the class and the experience also taught me about speechwriting. You’ll find the complete post here.

Learning from Great Commencement Speeches

microphoneI admit it, when it comes to the use of analytics, I’ve been a skeptic. I know the use of sophisticated statistical analysis has yielded important insights in many fields. But in some areas, like being a sports fan, it seemed to squeeze out the fun, and in other areas, like speechwriting, I was convinced it really didn’t have much of a useful role.

Well, I may have to give up some of my Luddite ways. Quantified Communications is doing really interesting work to (in their words) “combine data science and human expertise to improve the way people communicate.”

One blog post in particular caught my eye. QC used a proprietary analytical tool to see what CEO’s could learn from the 13 best commencement speeches of all time (as selected by Business Insider.) In particular, key characteristics of the commencement speeches were compared to important elements of the average executive keynote.

Every CEO and speechwriter for a CEO should pay heed to the findings.

First, the outstanding commencement speakers were much better at building trust through confident, authentic language than the average CEO. The commencement speeches came “across as 42% more authentic and 15% more confident.”

However, where the CEOs really lagged behind was in using “clear and engaging language to keep the audience’s attention.”  The great commencement speeches were a stunning 81% clearer and 86% more engaging than the average executive keynote.

Now, as someone who has heard and read a lot of executive presentations, I must say this finding doesn’t surprise me. I just hope these analytics will give communication pro’s ammunition they can use to encourage clients to do a lot more to build audience trust and engage listeners.

Adventures in Leadership

adventure-bookI can say for certain that I’ve never before written a post about somebody who has spent twenty years crisscrossing the continents to climb the world’s highest mountains. Seattle’s Matt Walker has done just that, but what makes him of interest to “The CEO at the Mic,” is the insight he gained at 24,000 feet during one moonlight in the Himalayas: that the essence of adventure could be a powerful tool to connect people with their leadership potential.

Now Matt helps people make that connection, strengthening their leadership qualities through keynotes, workshops, and team building adventure exercises. On his blog he also profiles experts who could be helpful to leaders looking to step up their game. Recently he was kind enough to include me. The interview was a great experience, and I think you’ll find it useful.

Here’s a preview:

Okay… is it really possible to improve a speech simply by using different words?

Absolutely. Speechwriting is writing for the ear. That is much different than writing for the eye, which is what you do when you produce an article or an annual report.

The complete interview is here.

My thanks to Matt.

“But That’s the Most Important Part of the Draft”

script editWhen you reach a certain level of experience as a speechwriter, and your hair turns a certain shade of grey, people new to the profession seek you out for advice. One of the most important, and challenging, questions I get is “What do you do when you’ve written a great script and the client makes changes that really weaken the draft?”

I usually respond with a long winded discussion of diplomacy in the workplace, the duties of a professional, the consultant/client balancing act, etc.

From now on, I’ll just refer all tyros to a terrific blog post by Mike Long, veteran speechwriter, author, educator, and award-winning screenwriter and playwright. (You can find it on his blog and on Vital Speeches of the Day.)

The whole piece is spot on, and the last full paragraph should be part of the Official Speechwriter’s Creed:

When requests for changes come back, accept or argue against them according to structure, substance, and taste. To hold onto your satisfaction with the work, consider any changes to be carpentry – customization of an already excellent product provided to get the paycheck. Cling to that first version as the evidence of your talent, and take your pleasure from having written something so good, even if it never escapes your hard drive and your client’s harsh opinion.

I would only add that it also helps to reserve part of your time for your own writing. Give speeches; do freelance articles;  or get creative with that novel, poem, or screenplay. As long as the writing is yours alone, it will help keep you happy…and sane.