Posts Tagged ‘Seattle’

China’s Speeches are on the Rise, too

Xi-JinpingThis summer I started working with a nonprofit CEO who regularly gives speeches outside the United States. My first assignment was to help with a presentation he will give this fall to a Chinese audience. (The speech will be given in English with simultaneous translation into Chinese).

As every good speechwriter should, I started the writing process by doing research. In particular, I decided to read speeches given by Chinese leaders, to get a sense of what Chinese audiences might have heard and might expect to hear.

To be honest, I was prepared to be pretty bored, based on past experience. Long, long ago I had studied Soviet and Eastern European politics, so I had read my fair share of speeches by Communist leaders. They were uniformly dull — long lists of exhortations to the masses and threats to the west, combined with long recitations of statistics “proving” that the Russian, East German, or Bulgarian workers were on the fast track to proletarian paradise.

Surprise!

The Chinese have apparently realized that leaders who give those kind of speeches get tossed on the trash heap of history. They’ve decided to do a lot better. Many of the speeches I read were pretty darn good. Some included key elements you’d expect from scripts written by top speech pros in the democratic west.

For example, take a look at a recent speech by President Xi to the National Committee on U.S.- China relations. Here’s what you’ll find:

  • The speech has been artfully tailored to a specific audience. President Xi spoke in Seattle. His first paragraph is all about that city and Washington state. He even references the film Sleepless in Seattle.
  • The speech ties the personal to policy. He’s not too personal, of course. But Xi does describe being a teenager who was sent from Beijing to work as a peasant in a small village… for seven years. He shares stories of how he and the villagers lived in caves and almost starved. Then he ties his story to the progress China has made and its commitment to development.
  • The speech is salted with quotes and humor (a little). The quotes (surprise) are mainly from “ancient Chinese sayings.” But he also quotes Henry Kissinger and Martin Luther King and there are a couple references to “the works of Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, and Jack London.” And he cites Hemingway to make a very mild mojito joke.

To be sure, that speech and others I read do include long laundry lists – of statistics, goals, accomplishments, etc. But it does seem that in speechwriting, as in so many other areas, the Chinese have no intention of lagging behind.